Scratch that

 

Jeremy Bell has created a tape-scratching device called the ScrubBoard. A tape loop with a tape head-scrubber that you can manipulate with your hands, resulting in a sound akin to scratching a record. There’s other great features. There’s a foot controller to play, stop and reverse playback of the loop. There’s a ‘rocker’ to cut/fade and mix to the tapes other channels. There’s also a record head to do live looping and scratching!

Nice work Jeremy!

http://www.jeremyseanbell.com/

Optical Sound

This clip describes the re-production of sound on films, using photographic processes. Sound waves are converted to varying voltages, which affect varying amounts of light, which is then projected and photographed onto the films optical sound track. This is how motion pictures sound tracks have been reproduced in cinemas right up till the 21st Century, hence printed digital sound tracks have become more common.

Here Soviet composer Arseny Avraamov draws wave forms with paint on paper and then films them onto the optical track with amazing results.

Practical effects

sound-revival_670James Boock

‘The objects use the analogue means of materials and mechanical movements to manipulate sound.
 Four objects create the effects of Tremolo, Reverb, Delay and Mouth Modulation.
Sound Revival aims to create a greater understanding of how sound effects are generated and gives visual identity to something unseen as a result of digital technology. Objectifying these effects brings intrigue back into the DJ performance and brings listeners and performer together.’